6 Examples of Retail Tech we Love

Shoes that change colour, personalised homepages and virtual reality fashion campaigns: these are a few of our favourite things in this week’s retail wrap up.

ecommerce

1) Beacons get bigger and better

Beacons are getting a makeover, courtesy of Smartfocus who’ve launched a virtual counterpart. The updated beacons, or Beacons 2.0 as we’ve dubbed them, boast significant improvements when compared to their predecessors.  The main upside is that they’re AC-powered and offer Bluetooth connectivity and radio waves transmission, whereas the older models just relied on low battery-powered Bluetooth.  This means that one beacon is enough to power an entire store – gotta love efficiency!  http://goo.gl/CxCcb9

2) Benefits of the intuitive in-store experience

Hybris Labs have undertaken a couple of awesome tech ventures that highlight the benefits of intuitive in-store technology. These include: sensors placed in ‘Funky Boxes’ which light up and change colour when a customer approaches a product and stands in front of it for a long time, and the use of RFID scanners to inform retail staff of the products a customer has brought into a change room. All of which are used to improve the customer service experience: http://goo.gl/Gcmkjs

3) Colour changing heels

You’ll be forgiven for thinking you’ve stumbled upon wizardry with the latest piece of wearable technology – a pair of heels that change colour via the use of a smartphone app. Created by iShüu Tech, the Volvorii Timeless smart shoe is available in black or white, although users can choose to change the shoe’s smart panel from black to white to a black and white pattern. Ladies, the cold, dark days of having to match your shoes to your dress are a thing of a past. This tech innovation has truly found its way to our hearts (and feet): http://goo.gl/rs6p82

4) Westfield’s SS15 campaign goes virtual

On the 27th of March, Westfield London will bring their spring/summer fashions to life via a virtual reality installation called Future Fashion. The project will focus on three core trends; denim, floral and future modern across a range of interactive experiences including virtual reality, personalised fashion avatars and the digital curation of products…to name a few. In doing this Westfield is bringing the journey of discovery into play, in order to generate an emotional reaction to the pieces showcased and drive transactions. It will be very interesting to see how this resonates with shoppers: http://goo.gl/kxYRGs

5) Stripe set to soar

After failing to grow at a sufficient rate, peer-to-peer payments transfer system Balanced, has announced its closure. This means big things for Stripe,  Balanced‘s transition partner, as an additional 320 customers  will be added to their ranks. This will see their market focus expand from a merchant based payment platform to accomodate peer-to-peer businesses. We’d definitely call that a win! http://goo.gl/WuvTY3

6) Very.co.uk gets personal

Have you ever ventured onto an online store with just a vague idea of what you’re after, only to be inundated with choice? Shop Direct, parent company to very.co.uk, is hoping to solve this frustrating problem through the introduction of personalised homepages. Not only will customers  get a personalised greeting by name, they’ll also be provided with products that fit their demographic and interests. This is a perfect example of using an emotional connection to facilitate a transaction. Currently, the site’s algorithm can serve up 1.2 million iterations of the homepage with this figure expected to rise to 3.5 million by the years end: http://goo.gl/IAx2nd

 

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